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Writer of Bad Poetry

A collection of musings and pretty things.
Apr 23 '14
spitswap:

okay portland

Bahahaha I saw this today.  What the fuck is wrong with this city…

spitswap:

okay portland

Bahahaha I saw this today. What the fuck is wrong with this city…

Apr 23 '14

a guide to terminology as used by western males of the species

prude - a woman who won’t fuck you

dyke - a woman who won’t fuck you because you have a penis

slut - a woman who fucks other people and not you

tease - a woman who won’t fuck you even though she smiled at you

feminist - a woman who won’t fuck you because she has, like, thoughts and stuff

(Source: societyghost)

Apr 23 '14

weirdoautisticseacat:

I want every person romanticizing the ’90s to go back and experience every since annoying inconvenience of the time.

Especially the inconvenience of liking a song, buying the CD from which it originated, and finding out that the CD was crap and only that one song was good.

You love the ’90s so much? You won’t after you experience dial-up and bad, overpriced CDs.

Let’s not forget residual Reaganism, the war on drugs, etc. Fuck the 90s.

Apr 22 '14
"

If you’re poor, the only way you’re likely to injure someone is the old traditional way: artisanal violence, we could call it – by hands, by knife, by club, or maybe modern hands-on violence, by gun or by car.

But if you’re tremendously wealthy, you can practice industrial-scale violence without any manual labor on your own part. You can, say, build a sweatshop factory that will collapse in Bangladesh and kill more people than any hands-on mass murderer ever did, or you can calculate risk and benefit about putting poisons or unsafe machines into the world, as manufacturers do every day. If you’re the leader of a country, you can declare war and kill by the hundreds of thousands or millions. And the nuclear superpowers – the US and Russia – still hold the option of destroying quite a lot of life on Earth.

So do the carbon barons. But when we talk about violence, we almost always talk about violence from below, not above.

Or so I thought when I received a press release last week from a climate group announcing that ” scientists say there is a direct link between changing climate and an increase in violence”. What the scientists actually said, in a not-so-newsworthy article in Nature two and a half years ago, is that there is higher conflict in the tropics in El Nino years, and that perhaps this will scale up to make our age of climate change also an era of civil and international conflict.

The message is that ordinary people will behave badly in an era of intensified climate change.

"
Apr 22 '14
bricksandmortarandchewinggum:

LOL.


Bahahahahaha is that so

bricksandmortarandchewinggum:

LOL.

Bahahahahaha is that so

Apr 21 '14

Church Transformed Into Restaurant

designed-for-life:

Award-wining Dutch design studio Piet Boon has recently completed the transformation of a chapel of a formal military hospital in Antwerp into ‘The Jane’ restaurant, a sophisticated premium gourmet destination.

Combining exquisite tastes with such a stunning venue, The Jane is bound to become a modern temple of haute cuisine, attracting people from around the world to its vaulted interior. Make sure you make a reservation though: you need to book a table at least three months in advance.

Read More

Pffft this is so classy. In Pittsburgh we make them into breweries and rock concert halls. Represent!

Apr 20 '14
Apr 18 '14
migizi:

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right 

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.


Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!
This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.
Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

Additionally, during the American Civil War, the same arguments that were made against abortion, are almost identical to the ones made currently.  Which is comforting, in a weird way. This period, however, was the one that charged up the subject the most and led to more legislation over it as many pills and ‘services’ cropped up to provide women abortion methods.
Read more here: http://coachlightpress.com/bygone/contraception.shtml

migizi:

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.

Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!

This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.

Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

Additionally, during the American Civil War, the same arguments that were made against abortion, are almost identical to the ones made currently.  Which is comforting, in a weird way. This period, however, was the one that charged up the subject the most and led to more legislation over it as many pills and ‘services’ cropped up to provide women abortion methods.

Read more here: http://coachlightpress.com/bygone/contraception.shtml

(Source: americanprogress.org)

Apr 16 '14

pgdigs:

Feb. 17, 1952:Baby Face” Palmer and the Hill District

Arthur “Baby Face” Palmer had a tough gig. In the course of doing his job, he was shot, stabbed, stoned and beaten. Once he was “kicked black and blue up to the hips by three dope addicts.”

Palmer was a Pittsburgh police officer who patrolled a portion of the Hill District described in a 1952 Pittsburgh Press article as “the city’s toughest, bloodiest beat.”

Accompanying the article were some extraordinary pictures, which we stumbled upon a few weeks ago. It was an accidental discovery, made possible by the fact that our archives are organized alphabetically. While searching for pictures of golfer Arnold Palmer, we saw a folder labeled “Arthur (Baby Face) Palmer,” and it is our rule at the Digs to always examine folders that include the nickname “Baby Face.”

Pictures inside the folder depict Palmer on the job, patrolling a 78-acre portion of the Hill District that centered on the intersection of Fullerton Street and Wylie Avenue.

Palmer’s beat included 30 “murky streets and trash-filled alleys” and approximately 6,500 residents. It was presented to readers of The Pittsburgh Press as a place of drug dealers, prostitutes and thieves who “preyed on the good people of the Hill.”

The pictures reflect the newspaper’s view — Palmer is shown making arrests and questioning people he finds suspicious. In one photograph, he stands over a stabbing victim.

History and those who lived in his portion of the Hill District before it was demolished to make way for the Civic Arena tell us another, more complex story of the neighborhood. Residents lived in crumbling tenements, but the area pulsed with activity. It was a place of churches, grocery stores, barber shops, bakeries, book stores, restaurants and schools.

Children played ball or tag in the streets and at night watched a parade of well-dressed and sometimes famous people stroll by on their way to nightclubs. Some of the world’s best jazz musicians cut their chops in Hill District spots like the Musician’s Club, The Savoy Ballroom, the Crawford Grill and The Ritz Club.

According to the Press article, though, the neighborhood exhibited a violent streak. Twelve killings were reported on Palmer’s beat in 1951. “The dead he’s discovered would fill a morgue, the shot and stabbed a hospital,” the Press noted. Each year Palmer jailed at least 1,000 men and women.  

For his efforts, he was paid $345 each month. And his nickname? It was the result of genetics — “his chubby face with its ruddy cheeks and smiling, gray eyes.”

— Steve Mellon 

I would be extremely curious to see what kind of perspective a black person who lived in the neighborhood in the 1950s would have on this fellow. I have a feeling it wouldn’t have the same tone.

Apr 13 '14

thegreatbritishcrumpet:

neganandsara:

"Girl crush" is literally the female version of no homo

My girl crushes are 100% homo

Apr 13 '14
"Yesterday, I spent 60 dollars on groceries,
took the bus home,
carried both bags with two good arms back to my studio apartment
and cooked myself dinner.
You and I may have different definitions of a good day.
This week, I paid my rent and my credit card bill,
worked 60 hours between my two jobs,
only saw the sun on my cigarette breaks
and slept like a rock.
Flossed in the morning,
locked my door,
and remembered to buy eggs.
My mother is proud of me.
It is not the kind of pride she brags about at the golf course.
She doesn’t combat topics like, ”My daughter got into Yale”
with, ”Oh yeah, my daughter remembered to buy eggs”
But she is proud.
See, she remembers what came before this.
The weeks where I forgot how to use my muscles,
how I would stay as silent as a thick fog for weeks.
She thought each phone call from an unknown number was the notice of my suicide.
These were the bad days.
My life was a gift that I wanted to return.
My head was a house of leaking faucets and burnt-out lightbulbs.
Depression, is a good lover.
So attentive; has this innate way of making everything about you.
And it is easy to forget that your bedroom is not the world,
That the dark shadows your pain casts is not mood-lighting.
It is easier to stay in this abusive relationship than fix the problems it has created.
Today, I slept in until 10,
cleaned every dish I own,
fought with the bank,
took care of paperwork.
You and I might have different definitions of adulthood.
I don’t work for salary, I didn’t graduate from college,
but I don’t speak for others anymore,
and I don’t regret anything I can’t genuinely apologize for.
And my mother is proud of me.
I burned down a house of depression,
I painted over murals of greyscale,
and it was hard to rewrite my life into one I wanted to live
But today, I want to live.
I didn’t salivate over sharp knives,
or envy the boy who tossed himself off the Brooklyn bridge.
I just cleaned my bathroom,
did the laundry,
called my brother.
Told him, “it was a good day."

Kait Rokowski (A Good Day)

My poor Lisa. 2.1.90-4.6.14 <3

(Source: justsingyourlifeaway)

Apr 10 '14

letsnotmakesensetogether asked:

Oh, can I ask why you dislike the autism ad?

goldenheartedrose:

purplewowies:

I… can’t quite put it in words. A lot of it probably has to do with the weird stretching and the implication that autistic people are “unreachable”.

If anyone who follows me also dislikes the “the longer without detection, the harder to reach” ads that put kids at the end of long tables or beds and such, please feel free to express your opinions, because I’m sucking at expressing mine.

I hate it because it implies that autistic people can be “Fixed” with early intervention services, which is what the ad is urging people to do - to get their kid evaluated early. While early evaluation is great because then you know the issue and how to adapt, it also puts a lot of pressure on making a very young autistic person conform to neurotypical standards that they might not have been forced into had the information that they are autistic been unknown.

Kids as young as 2 are being diagnosed with autism, and I don’t think that most of them are misdiagnosed, but that’s an awful lot of pressure to put on a kid who is just past the walking stage. Also, in case it’s unclear, no, I don’t think that trying to force an autistic kid to behave like a neurotypical one is an ideal we should be aiming for and that’s because you’re going to be massively unsuccessful if you try (or are going to cause massive anxiety for the kid in question - probably both, actually).

I despise these ads. Yes, typical communication methods do not always work with autistic people, but that means you need to get your head out of your ass and try something else. It’s like yelling in English at someone who speaks French. We hear you yelling but we don’t understand. Stop trying to “fix” us. We’re not broken, you’re just lazy.

Apr 9 '14
nativeamericannews:

An Editorial Cartoon on Native American Mascots Comes to Life in Cleveland
Last week, a die-hard fan of the Cleveland Indians named Pedro Rodriguez expressed his love for the baseball club as he has each year for the past decade, by attending the first game of the new season dressed in homage to Chief Wahoo, the club’s Native American mascot, in a feathered headdress with his skin painted bright red.

Ugggh.

nativeamericannews:

An Editorial Cartoon on Native American Mascots Comes to Life in Cleveland

Last week, a die-hard fan of the Cleveland Indians named Pedro Rodriguez expressed his love for the baseball club as he has each year for the past decade, by attending the first game of the new season dressed in homage to Chief Wahoo, the club’s Native American mascot, in a feathered headdress with his skin painted bright red.

Ugggh.

Apr 5 '14
"Society has put up so many boundaries, so many limitations on what’s right and wrong that it’s almost impossible to get a pure thought out. It’s like a little kid, a little boy, looking at colors, and no one told him what colors are good, before somebody tells you you shouldn’t like pink because that’s for girls, or you’d instantly become a gay two-year-old. Why would anyone pick blue over pink? Pink is obviously a better color. Everyone’s born confident, and everything’s taken away from you."

Kanye West (via emilyteix)

(via femburton)

reblogging for pink is obviously a better color

(via jcbpaisley)

He’s so right, too. 

(via galesofnovember)

did i already reblog th—wait i dont care

(via gqgqqt)

Apr 2 '14
"Be curious. Read widely. Try new things. I think that a lot of what people call intelligence just boils down to curiosity."

Aaron Swartz

A simple recipe for making life delicious. A fine thought, Aaron.

 (via kevinthebigapple)